As it comes

queue-topTaking things as they come is a good approach in daily life, especially here.

Plans and intentions are always there — but the next phase is a gamble.

The most frequent example is Tanesco: whenever they make a plan, the rest of us must be flexible.

Just forget about the washing machine, a report or any online work for the day and maybe go read a book.

Fundis scheduled to do welding of a gate or drilling in the wall will agree it cannot be done.

Labda kesho is always a chance, who knows about tomorrow

Then there are the more complex issues: new rules and regulations are issued by TRA or Immigration.

queue

After a long wait in queues, one can be sent home to collect an additional document or to return another day. Knowing all these daily challenges I can also understand better why people like to stick strongly to certain routines.

One can read in the paper or sometimes find details of these changes online, however the offices implementing the plans are often at a loss.

Maybe workers have not been informed or tools, updated forms and computer programmes are not yet provided.

As a customer one has to take it day by day.

After a long wait in queues, one can be sent home to collect an additional document or to return another day.

A better solution is to wait and see first — hear from other people’s experiences and give the institutions time to get sorted.

Knowing all these daily challenges I can also understand better why people like to stick strongly to certain routines.

Why a worker who waters the garden every morning, will do it always — even when the sky has turned dark and it will most probably rain.

Why cleaners will stick to the same round of their work — not looking look in far corners or high places for accumulated dust or dirt but rather mopping the floors as always.

‘Day by day the same’ can be a comfort when on other levels life is a constant challenge.

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About the Author

Josie van den Hoek

Josie first visited Dar es Salaam in 2000 and is still here. She writes about encounters on her daily walks and Tanzanian life.